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20121006
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Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)
. it depends on the freedom of citizens to speak their minds and assemble without fear. and on the rule of law and due process that guarantees the rights of all people. in other words, a true democracy, real freedom is hard work. those in power have to resist the temptation to crack down on dissidents. in hard economic times, countries must be tempted -- may be tempted to rally the people around perceived enemies at home and abroad, rather than focusing on the pain-staking work of reform. moreover, there will always be those who reject human progress. dictators to cling to power. corrupt interests that depend on the status quo. and extremists who fanned the flames of hate and division. from northern ireland to south asia. from africa to the americas. from the balkans to the pacific rim, we have witnessed the convulsions that can accompany transitions to a new political order. at the time, the conflicts arise along the fault lines of race or tribe and often they arise from the difficulties of reconciling tradition and faith with the diversity and independence of the modern world. in every count
and that compliance with the law is not optional. the man who heads the firm shall accused of voting fraud, is defending his firm tonight. senior correspondent eric shawn has that story. >> bret: the head of the company at the center of the voter fraud allegations says thinks firm will be vindicated. >> i think we did a very good job. >> a republican operative claims a handful of exworkers for violating company policy and the law. his company, strategic allied consulting is being investigated by florida authorities. >> when law enforcement looks into that situation, what they'll find our company had a systemic effort of quality control at that looked for people trying to cheat the system. when we found them we fired them and we have a long paper trail a handful of people we caught cheating the system were fired and turned over to investigators for prosecution. >> of 5,000 workers, he says that fewer than 10 did something wrong. out of florida out of 50,000 forms only about 150 have raised problems and in north carolina out of 15,000 forms, only 5 were flagged. he says his firm also registe
. defying the laws of history, we did just that. we gathered the exiles. we store our -- restored our independence and rebuild our life. the jewish people have come home. we will never be uprooted again. [applause] yom kippur.as your income f we have come together on this day of reflection and atonement. we take stock of our past. we pray for our future. we remembered are persecution -- our persecution. we remember the great travails of our dispersion. we mourn the extermination of 6 million people in the holocaust. but at the end of this holiday, we celebrate the birth of israel. we celebrate the terrorism of our young men and women who defended -- heroism of our younn and women who defended israel. in israel, we walk the same paths tried by abraham and jacob. we blaze new trails in science, technology, medicine, agriculture. in israel, the past and the future find common ground. unfortunately, that is not the case in many other countries. today, a great battle is being waged between the modern and the medieval. the forces of maternity seek a bright future -- modernity seek a bright
annually for judges, attorneys, law school students and judges and officials. as for the new term the supreme court is set to take up a slew of cases some dealing with civil rights following the blockbuster decisions we all watched last term, involving immigration and president obama's health care law. shannon bream now with the news from washington. shannon? >> monday kicks off the brand new term in the supreme court and there are a number of controversial disputes awaiting the justices. at least six of nine justices attended the traditional pre-term red mass in washington on sunday, a tradition started back in 1928 in new york, praers for wisdom and inspiration for all members of the judiciary. on monday the court will consider whether nigeria citizens can sue shell oil company in u.s. court for human rights abuses they say the company committed in nigeria, one of the most anticipated, student who she was not admitted to the university because of race based. and justice kennedy will be the swing vote in that case and expected to take up one case related to same sex marriage and
and florida as well. which is against the law . >> did you see governor chris christie. he's back. >> stop lying mr. president. >> lying? >> yes. that is what i say. >> gretchen: he doesn't stop there. and hear what he said about the media. >> eric: what does the numbers say. stewart varney here with what you need to know. hey! did you know that honey nut cheerios has oats that can help lower cholesterol? and it tastes good? sure does! wow. it's the honey, it makes it taste so... well, would you look at the time... what's the rush? be happy. be healthy. now we need a little bit more... a little bit more vanilla? this is great! [ male announcer ] at humana, we believe there's never been a better time to share your passions... because the results... are you having fun doing this? yeah. that's a very nice cake! [ male announcer ] well, you can't beat them. [ giggles ] ohh! you got something huh? whoa... [ male announcer ] humana understands the value of spending time together that's a lot of work getting that one in! let's go see the birdies. [ male announcer ] one on one, sharing
has just enumerated, but also because the world has changed around us. in part because the laws our policy. we spent an awful lot of time, effort and money after world war ii creating an international system, economic system in particular to stimulate the growth in the rest of the world. so, this is the success of the policy of several decades that has made us relatively less strong in terms of disposable cash and disposable incentives to get to the behavior that we want to see. militarily, we surely are as strong as we have ever been, but we live in a world that has a number of nuclear powers and we still live in the world before 1957 that had not. so, other than us. you know, to me it hardly even seems worth debating this is a different world. >> i was told we have to debate. [inaudible] the decline is the wrong word. i think the world is getting more crowded. they are growing faster and in economic terms the u.s. will have the west shared wealth for the years ahead but there isn't a country by the way that is as jessica said that is a story of american success. it's for 60 years
the antitrust laws. that was ideological and they did not like william jennings bryan because they thought he was a socialist. they said if you want our thinking and the white house, we want somebody who sees things our way. the great line that came after that was that theodore roosevelt could not stay bought. theodore roosevelt said we should have public funding out of the treasury. if you look back at the supreme court in the citizens united case, you see a court that has two dare -- very different views over what is happening. we have your view which is a perfectly respectable view of the aspirations that there will these -- will be these independent groups speaking and saying what they want to say. it will be fully disclosed and it will not be corrupting independents. then you have the minority that caught the reality of most of the spending this year. their view was that this would be funded by giant corporations with specific legislative interests. that is why they will give so much money. it turns out it is not fully disclosed. it turns out it is not for individual candidates. it perha
're no jack kennedy. >> since roe v. wade has been the law for 20 years, we should sustain and support it, and i sustain and support that law and the right of a woman to make that choice, and my personal beliefs like the personal beliefs of other people should not be brought into a political campaign. >> on the question of the choice issue, i have supported the roe v. wade. i am pro-choice. >> wow. you know, you take a look at these clips. it brings you back a little bit, but it really does make the point there that, you know, these things can hit like torpedos if they're delivered right, and. >> great trip down memory lane. in the romney debate senator ted kennedy back in 1994. yeah, you're right. we've seen some reporting on this that, you know, mitt romney is doing a lot of preparation on this for this debate. maybe focussing on zingers and one-liners, and also the campaign says what mitt romney really wants to do on wednesday night where the two candidates showed down and show that choice between what mitt romney would do in the white house over the next four years or what president o
in her purse. >>> so finding a cure for miners will soon be against the law in california. the state is the first in the nation to ban so-called gay conversion therapies targeting children and teenagers. this law takes effect in january. >> thank you for the update. our team, richard socarides sitting right next to me so i can stop him when i need to. he's worked with the new yorker dotcom, he writes for them, former senior adviser to president clinton. ron brownstein at the other side of the table, editorial director of national journal and kellyanne conway is the president of the polling company women trend. nice to have you with us. our get real this morning. this one is so disturbing to me. 7-year-old girl gets food stuck in her hair. you have a 7-year-old so you know this age well. the assistant teacher decides to remove the food from her hair. how does she do it? by cutting the girl's hair off. apparently removed, well the mother believes, the mother's name is jessica sturwalt in north carolina. she says it was seven or eight inches of hair that they cut off this little girl. t
on the rule of law and not the force of arms. we must rely on the body of rules that state the dispute must be resolved peacefully. >> vietnam's deputy minister of foreign affairs resisted china's demands that the disputes be resolved through bilateral negotiations. he called on asean countries to work together. >> we should recognize the increasingly important role of negotiations. asean continues to play a central role in the regional architecture and promotes peace, stability, and security in the region including the south china sea. >> an important asean meeting in july broke up without a joint communique. the group failed to agree on how some member nations should resolve their disputes with china. cambodia's position was apparently influenced by its close economic relationship with china. >>> the world bank says 200 million people around the globe are without jobs due in part to the impact of europe's debt crisis. 40% of them are age 24 or younger. bank officials have released the 2013 world development report. they say these 200 million people are unoemployed despite their active eff
ways to reduce the number of abortions. we got to think about why our law enforcement community --our working mothers are in trouble. we have to get free natal care for them. have too many children coming into kindergarten behind, and if we lose them in kindergarten, we lose them for ever. 2500 kids in a program here in omaha that are provided refuge that are being sexually abused in their own home. we got to pay attention to them, and we got to help them and the moms and the community leaders who are trying to help this problem. i do not think we should regulate women in making these decisions. it does not stop there. there is lots more that needs to make sure that that children have a fair and decent opportunity to live to their full potential. >> i am pro life. i believe in the sanctity of life. i believe there should be an exception made for the life of the mother. what we are looking at is an economy that is hurting families. we're looking at an economy that tends to hurt women more. the situation we're in the last four years, it is hurting women. women are not able to find jobs.
on pennsylvania's controversial voter. >> i d. law. it's estimated the law's photo i.d. requirement to exclude 750,000 people from voting. the law upheld by a lower court but the state supreme court ordered the judge to assess whether all eligible voters would be allowed to obtain the allowable forms of i.d. >>> and the jimmy hoffa investigation turns up nothing. waiting for tests on mud and clay examples before declaring it a total dud. a tipster claimed he saw what appeared to be a body buried at the site the say after the teamsters chief disappeared in 1975. >> you can skeptical from the beginning. >> please. me and a million other people, right? >>> and the carmageddon. the freeway back open. it shut down a ten-mile stretch of 405 this weekend. one of busiest highways in the nation. l.a. drivers asked to plan accordingly but there were no major traffic jams. >> that's good news. >>> ah, i know. you're distraught over this. an epic collapse by the u.s. at the 39th ryder cup. the europeans roaring back from a deficit to stage a breathtaking 4 1/2 to 13 1/2 point win. sinking a five-put putt to s
. >> obviously there are serious criminal charges being pressed and the full force of the law obviously needs to play on that. the bigger issue about how a democcy fashion as proper conversation in fragmented societies is something that i think is very, very profound. but if you think about it, the gridlock you complain about, we can't get agreement in our country about building a third runway in heathrow airport, much less care about the elderly swrenchts the same problem. >> there is gridlock on syria, there is grid lock on the saving of the eu, there is gridlock at the national politics, and representative politics is facing a very, very buying set of charges, people feel they are t getting a proper say. now, there are rorms in every country that are going to have to be particular to that country, but there is a more generic issue about how in a world of multiaccess to information we have a proper conversation about how to take our countries forward. >> it is good to see you. >> very nice to see you. >> david miliband, former foreign minister and now a member of parliament in great britain
talking about their legal rights and i am sure there are some law students in the room. when you read the book and the legal documents about the declaration, you understand about legal advice and international, finding, legal rights to jews and the rights to the land. i call this the common sense rights. [inaudible] this side was aggressive and started the war in and saying, you know, above my land back, -- even in the united states, nobody comes and tells you that we want our land back after we lost the war. the common sense rights should be something that should be said straightly. it enables us to espouse another role. [inaudible] if you lose, you lose. i've been talking about the rights about something very important, many times because of the pressure, coming from washington and the u.s., we tend not to speak about what belongs to us and what we believe, and i chose the name of the book "isreal: the will to prevail" because i think it is all about us. if we have the will to live, the will and the courage of the nation, we would be able to prevail. if we would try to satisfy every
thing. my father-in-law talked about being a public servant is the ultimate kind of service, the ultimate job that you can have. he was absolutely correct, because to me there was nothing more satisfying than to be in sacramento, to solve problems, work with everyone together, bring everyone together, and to just chip away, keep solving problems, and serve the people, because as an immigrant, as an immigrant, it is especially very satisfying that you can give something back to this country. you know, to be able to say thank you, to a place that's received you with open arms, and where i saw firsthand that the harder i worked, the more i accomplished, the more i achieved, there was no obstacle there. there was no -- not like in europe, when i grew up, where there were obstacles after obstacles for you to get successful. here there was no obstacle. everyone wished you good luck and everyone said, yeah, you can do it. of course with my outrageous dreams that i had, i even found people in america that said, no, that's impossible, arnold when i said i want to be a leading man in
as a humanitarian disaster in syria. and it is clearly a violation of international law. but i think seen from a strategic point of view both russia and china should have a self-interest in being so to speak on the right side of history. and i think that could be an argument for them in favor of delivering a clear and unified and strong message from the international community. >> rose: do you think it's a stalemate today? >> more or less it is a stalemate. with severe consequences for the people of syria. and i think the international community has a responsibility to deliver a very clear message to the assad regime that they must stop violence and initiate a process towards democracy in syria. no regime can in the long-term neglect the will of the people. >> rose: when you look at the balkans, we had an intervention without a u.n. resolution. nato acted without a u.n. resolution. can you imagine that happening in syria? >> testimony brief answer is no, but let me stress that nato acted on the basic of the principles of the u.n. charter when we took responsibility for the operation in kosovo.
young as 10 being caught in the act and the kid is taken in by law enforcement and often charged as a criminal for the crime of prostitution, and the man who is buying the services of a minor is sent home. we don't want to ruin your life, we don't want to make things hard for you, go home to your wife and family. >> pretty disturbing and unbelievable thing to hear. we had an extensive conversation. we will bring you our full conversation tomorrow night at 7:00. thanks for joining us. "ac 360" starts now. >>> good evening, everyone. we have breaking news tonight in the wake of the libya tragedy. late word tonight from the u.s. state department they're pulling more staffers out of the embassy in tripoli because of security concerns. also tonight, also security related, new details. they're coming in reaction to our exclusive reporting last night on how quickly officials actually suspected that the killing of four americans in benghazi was an act of terror, and how troubled the subsequent investigation into that deadly assault is turning out to be. today, 16 days after the attack, d
of law. douglas kennedy is live in our newsroom here in new york on that. what did you find out, douglas. >> there are currently 725 convicted criminals on death row in california. now some state residents want all of their lives spared, and they are getting support from a famous prosecutor. >> the $184 million that the death penalty is costing, it's a total waste of money. it's flushing it down the toilet. >> gil garcetti spent 32 years inside the los angeles district attorney's office. >> you prosecuted dozens of death penalty cases. >> we did. we not just prosecuted them but we convicted most of them. >> but garcetti has since changed his mind about giving fell ons the ultimate punishment. he says death penalty cases are simply too expensive and he says he knows from personal experience there is a lot of room for error. >> killing people is a huge responsibility and the criminal justice system isn't always perfect. >> it's not, unfortunately. we are dealing with human beings, so there is fallibility right? >> garcetti is supporting prop 34, which would eliminate the death penalty in c
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)